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of the monetary stimulus out of the equation if the economy is getting better. and he says, the economy is showing signs of getting better and we think by year end and into 2014, it's going to be better still. so we anticipate being able to take away some of the scaffolding around this building and let it see whether it can stand on its own two feet. why is that bad news? why are commodities, stocks and bonds selling off on what, really, you could interpret as good news? >> i think it really isn't bad news, and i do think that much of what chairman bernanke said yesterday was in line with market expectations, but it clearly wasn't in line with investor positioning. so people are selling because they had a different expectation of where the fed was going to be. we now have a situation where there is some concern coming out of the markets, are the feds going to move too soon? i think that's unlikely. inflation continues to fall, so we're in a disinflationary environment. i think the feds' investments on employment are probably accurate, so i think as we look at the second half of the year, positions
point. the economy is soft, inflation virtually non-existent and i'm just going to add why risk deflation when we barely have a recovery at all? one major consequence of the bernanke policy of ending bond purchases is the big jump in interest rates and that, in turn, changes stock market valuations and that is one big reason for the large correction in stocks this week. no one can foretell the future. least of all, me. but let me just ask a couple of questions here. have treasury rates completely discounted an end to qe, okay? i don't think they have. here's my fear. i'm just going to say this. if you play this out, the ten-year treasury ought to be the same as the growth of total spending or nominal gdp in the economy and that's 3.5%, maybe 4%. we're at 2.5% on the treasury. in other words, in the last year we'll be looking at rates going to 4% in treasurys and i don't think that's in the market yet. now, also, will both stocks and bonds play cat and mouse with the fed? every day, every week, every month for the next couple of months. that's going to be a tough one. since i don
what he said? valuations are attractive still. businesses are doing well. the economy is strengthening. get this. he says even with $20 billion, he opportunity have enough money to take advantage of all the opportunities here. >> 20. it's not all his. >> he says he's not looking at this point like, look, maybe the rate of the market has slowed down. we're not talking about three year doubles at this point. he says for his funds he's looking more five or six years for doubling. maybe nine or ten for the market. still talking about a very strong market and a place he sees great opportunity. >> these are times you try to keep your cool. >> got to have some powder. got to have dry powder. >> i wish we had all the guys looking for -- if they were to come on and say no, no, no, i'd feel better. they're never able to pull the trigger. want to go overseas? >> i think we should. for a moment. >> take us there. >> i hear this whole thing in china is kind of just not just ben bernanke creating some problems. let's talk about trading in asia and europe today. ross westgate standing by in london. f
an immigration system in our country that meets the needs of a growing economy, the biggest economy in the world that focuses on making our country stronger, not weaker, and hopefully will put this debate behind us. so i yield the floor. >> yield for a question. first could i say all of us who have had the honor of working with you and the senator from north dakota greatly appreciate the work that you've done. if there is going to be a broad bipartisan support for the final product it will be because of what you and the senator from north dakota have done. and i'm very, very grateful for that. and i think that it is important wouldn't you agree that people understand that this is a very tough bill. and it required a lot of cooperation from our friends on the other side of the aisle to go along and agree with this. i think that they've shown a great deal of compromise in order to reach this point and agree with us on this legislation, which clearly we need bipartisan support for. but i would like to ask the senator again for a couple of specifics. because i think it is important we understand how
mean for commerce and economy. >>> and now a backing off of a bid for sprint by dish, and they will concentrate on clearwire. >>> and also, a look at icahn stepping up dell bid. >>> and now the fed is wrapping up the two-day policy meeting this afternoon. investors hoping that fed will provide clarity about how and when the fed will wind down the bond buying program. make sure to watch the statement, and ben bernanke's news conference which is i perhaps more important, and it starts at 2:00 p.m., and one way or another, it is going to be nice to get something out of the way, wouldn't it? >> yes, i used to regard these events as big bad events when i worked at the hedge fund, because there could be relief even if he says the wrong thing and i'd love for him to address the 10-year, because it signals that the e kconomy is better, b it is not just weak. but if you address the 10-year, i'm in control and the bond vigilantes are not. i believe when this is over, we will come back and discuss -- i'm not kidding -- stocks. >> although, is it possible that the language that h
't think the economy is that strong yet. that would be another conversation on the line, but i think the interest rate -- the jump in interest rates is more once again of a knee jerk reaction. >> do you agree with that, because it does feel as though we're kind of at an infliction point in terms of rates, and this has been a really big backup this week in rates even though we're still at historically low levels. >> as much as i love kenny, i disagree with the big guy. an overreaction, no. we aren't seeing an overreaction. big ben. came out with the bernanke belly flop when he inadvertently suggested that they can move the stimulus or even taper on unemployment target. went from 6.9% up to 7%. that was huge, and that's when the ripple effects and the tsunami came into the treasury pits behind me. they began selling it, and right now, sue, severe technical damage, so the treasury market, obviously 7 and above, 2.40 in the ten-year note is very difficult. equity bounced off this 100-day moving average of 15.75 which coincides with the multi-year high. a lot of people were caught offside
is not only allowing inflation, but the fact that it won't come down. and now the u.s. economy has to take into account that and the move of rates and the 1.5% move in rates is a hard pill to follow. >> and scott n the last three or maybe four, the feds have come in, and they have said, i am short the 10-year and take a boatload and every year they are wrong, and perhaps now, but to this point, we are waiting for an appreciable move in rates for year and years and the fact that the economy may not stand on its own legs is curious to me. i am curious what you are hearing out there, as well, scott, in terms of the pain people are taking on the fixed income side, and those who are not short credit and obviously watching the equities sell off. >> the market, whether it is treasuries or equities, the market was probably hoping and probably against the better judgment probably that bernanke yesterday was going to sort of walk it back, and walk back the notion that they were going to mention taper org that -- tapering or going to do it any time soon and we know that the people you are talking abo
is in cities and metropolitan contraries because these are the engines of the economy, centers of trade and investment. top 100 metros so only one ace of the land mast, two-thirds of the population, three quarters of the gdp and on every indicator that matters, infrastructure and human capital and innovation. 75, 80, 85, 90% of the nations share. there really is no american economy. what we have is a network of metro economies and they're now stepping up and doing the hard work. >> but at the same time we all know that some of the toughest economic challenges are the state and local level. >> absolutely. but the great thing about metropolitan areas is they're not just governments. you know, the federal government is a government. state governments are government, metropolitan areas are networks. and we see that these networks are finding really creative and beneficial ways. >> rose: networks between what? >> networks of different companies, different philanthropic groups, different individuals, all coming together. they have loose or tight connections. and they can fund things more-- in
morning to you. leaders of the world's most powerful economies are gathering in northern ireland for a two-day summit. british prime minister david cameron is the host, and he's pushing for countries to share more financial information. leaders there also expected to discuss differences on some of the big issues. syria's civil war, free trade between europe and north america and of course global tax evasion. we'll have a live report from steve sedgwick on the ground in the next hour. >>> unions in turkey, they're on a owuone-day strike over the eviction of protesters from a park in istanbul. police and protesters clashed from sporadically overnight following a weekend of scuffles in the city. nbc's richard engel will join us with the latest in the next hour. >>> also in corporate news this morning, a large activist investor in smithfield foods is pressuring the company to explore a break-up rather than go ahead with that planned $4.7 billion takeover by a chinese meat producer. i don't know if this is going to make joe happy or not, but "the wall street journal" reporting that starboard va
about how the economy is still a bit dicey and jobs aren't being created fast enough. now they're thinking he just wants to put everybody to work, he's not worried about the bonds. bondholders are saying to heck with this, you're not going to protect us, economy is way too strong for bernanke to keep buying bonds, he can't keep rates down, he shouldn't even try. the owners of bonds aren't as worried about the ongoing drag of the federal government that bernanke's fretting about and talked about today. they aren't worried about higher taxes, sequester spending cuts or any lack of any serious attempt by elected officials to get hiring going. they are selling their bonds right now before things get so much better that those bonds will be worth even less! to understand how bonds work i've got to do something different because i know a lot of people can't tell the difference between a stock and a bond. so i'm going to -- i'm going to do a little fictional analysis here. imagine that the united states is a publicly traded company. and it's got this really counterintuitive stock that
the economy may not be enough to draw the sim lus in fine 13. what's that mean? in 1937, when we were coming out of the great depression, the white house and congress decided things were bouncing back strong! strong enough that it was time to start closing the deficit by raising taxes and putting less financial support into the economy t. fed agreechltd hey, come on, man, it was a first class disaster. >> the house of pain! >> it turned out to be a recession within a depression. now the president and congress have raised taxes as a part of the fiscal cliff deal. they agreed to the sequester, which was supposed to cut the defend spending. it is impacting a lot of little programs the media isn't focused on. wetion heard much about it. the fact that they're at 52-week highs, makes it seem like the sequester doesn't matter at all, who cares? government just doesn't know what it's doing. that's not the point. the point is neither the president or congress is doing anything extra substantive to get it moving beyond what it's done. we have for the interstate highway to build out over ike. we have n
of a timetable on it, saying if the forecast for the economy goes as planned, we'll start reducing the amount of -- combination for the economy by the end of this year and we'll end it next year. he tried to go to great, great lengths to say, you know what, that doesn't mean we're tightening on the economy, just we're not stimulating the economy as much as we do before. >> we've seen the market drop even lower today. there is some thought that that might actually have to do with what's happening in china as well. can you talk a little bit about that? >> i think that's a piece of it. we got negative data out of china that was a bit of a surprise. there's concern about the chinese central bank there, the people's bank of china clamping down on bank lending there so maybe you'd have what you call a hard landing where things would stop a little more abruptly than had been anticipated. the data out of the u.s. was a mix. we're kind of feeling our way along here. i think the real concern for the markets right now is does the fed make a mistake here? does it end up withdrawing the stimulus from the
to start closing the deficit by raising taxes and putting less financial support into the economy. fed agreed. hey, come on, man, it was a first class disaster. >> the house of pain! >> it turned out to be a recession within a depression. now the president and congress have raised taxes as a part of the fiscal cliff deal. they both agreed to the sequester, which was supposed to cut defense spending. it is impacting a lot of little programs the media isn't focused on. we haven't heard much about it. the fact that they're at 52-week highs, makes it seem like the sequester doesn't matter at all, who cares? government just doesn't know what it's doing. that's not the point. the point is neither the president or congress is doing anything extra, anything substantive to get it moving beyond what's done. we have no interstate highway to build out over ike. we have no wars, fortunately, like world war ii. we don't have a problem to fix bridges and tunnels. i often think the pipeline companies and google, google are doing more to help infrastructure and the government. into the breech comes ben
the eurozone economy, arguing that recent signs of market stabilization mean that the ecb's interest rates are becoming a more effective tool again. we'll see about that. >>> also, g-8 leaders are wrapping up a summit in northern ireland today. british prime minister david cameron has, of course, been the host. he says the goal of the group is to "fired up our economies and drive growth and prosperity around the world." we're going to have more, of course, from cnbc's steve sedgwick, who's on the ground there in that beautiful live shot in about 20 minutes. >>> meantime, time for "the global markets report." we'll go across the pond not to ireland, but to london, where ross westgate is standing by this morning amid a sea of green. a little bit of red around. how are you doing, ross? >> yeah, hey, andrew, pretty good. we're actually at the best levels of the session today here for european equities. advances out-pacing decliners by around about, what, 6-2, 7-2 on the dow jones stocks 600. it's been a mixed morning, but the ftse 100 now up 0.8%, despite the that is correct if inflation numbe
the food away, and buy one lobster and get one lobster, and it is bad. darden blames the economy for people not spending at lo of money to buy the breadsticks. i don't want to hear that. >> and meanwhile, we think that the economy is improving and yesterday the numbers in a different environment most likely would have been positives for the equity market, but we are not overwhelmed by the worries of the philly fed, and numbers that most people thought were better than they thought it would be. >> and i look at the bonds and how is the 10-year, strong. okay. buy me 50,000, whatever. we are in one of the moments and if we are not looking at the bonds, you know, having fun. >> and something else that people were looking at is the chinese shibor. we don't talk about it a lot. >> right, something that can jump up to bite you. >> and the rate has come down overnight, and they are trying to tighten up the money supply, and tighten it up, and the corporate inflows are not as strong as they might have originally been for china, but all part of the plan in a way of 300 million people, and 15 years to
, and the future in 30 minutes. talking about how you size up the economy today, how we got into such a bad place in 2008, and what economic policy makers need to do next. i would like to start talking about the present. how do you assess the global economy and the u.s. economy, and the extent to which there is any momentum or possibility for faster growth? >> basically, i would describe both the united states and the rest of the world as being in a sluggish environment where effective demand, if we can use that old-fashioned term, is inadequate to galvanize the system in the growth. yet there is not enough downside weakness to create any significant short-term changes that i can see. there are very huge imbalances out there. what i find startling is there are so many things -- which nothing is happening. for example, the european central bank had this huge trillion-euro rise a couple years ago of the assets in their balance sheet. then it came down a little bit. and for the last several months it has been absolutely flat. in other words, the extent to hich nothing is happening. it is just not cr
people have looked at the economy and said, wait a minute, we're not nearly to the point where the fed can take its foot off the gas. but if you look at their forecast for not only this year, but even moving forward, they are a little bit ahead of where consensus is and that's key to what they. >> 2.6. i want to see loan growth. you don't have new splurge in housing, obviously, because the people are kind of caught up by the rates. but, yes, the stocks that acted well last week, i used again mills and bristol meyers, imminent recession in 8 to 12 months. they bottomed. you don't want to see that. in other words, this is the fed step as way and people believe that there's nothing there. i'd like to think the fed stays in, until we get more than one month of good loan growth. >> to that point, you are talking about my multiple stocks there. they had something to be taken out of them given what were, what multiples -- >> 18, 20. >> higher than some of the peers in the biotechnology sphere which is hard to believe because they're going at a good rate faster. >> i don't want to get caught i
a facebook page now. so, you know, the world has really changed, and our energy economy has similarly changed. if you go back again to that time ten years ago, oil production, of course, continued to fall in the united states, imports increasing dramatically. top business leaders and thinkers from lee raymond to alan greenspan be projected an enormous natural gas shortfall and, in fact, there were lots of investments for lng imports. today we talk about blend w5u8 problems. pv, distributed pv, $10 a watt. today we're talking about incredibly reduced costs. wind power up by a factor of 15 in that time period. so there really has been tremendous change, in fact, even in the four years since president obama took office we've seen this. most especially, of course, we all know how unconventional gas and oil have been a game changer in this, in this country. we often think of the energy industry, the energy system as one of incredible inertia and very hard and resistant to change. and there are some, there is some truth in that, and there are some good reasons. capital intensity, all kinds of issue
about the underlying economy. >> it's the economico outlook. >> you don't think he'll use the word? >> i don't think he'll use the letter. >> people will ask questions. >> but as long as -- as long as it doesn't start with a t. if there is a t in the world somewhere, he may use it. >> we could have a drinking game. first question has to be about tapering. will use the word taper. >> either tape ever or your ter. >> i was at a party with a drinking game, but it was with lemonade. makes no sense. they're practicing for the day when -- legmonade, you'll just get sick. >> that's okay. learn a lesson. >> i know. >> let's take a look at europe. again, futures are indicated higher and that may be because the expectation is that the fed will in fact slightly lower their economic outlook. if that he another case, you would expect they would not be pulling qe anytime soon. but right now the market is barely bunching in europe. in asia, you can see the nikkei was up about 1.8%. so volatility continues there. hang seng down by just over 1%. oil prices right now are indicated up about 50 cents. wti i
, promotes growth and creates jobs, investments in infrastructure and innovation, expands our economy and strengthens the middle class and responsibly reduces the deficit. cognizant van hollen has been our leader on budget issues and the -- always promoting a budget as a statement of our national values of fairness, and opportunity, while reducing the deficit. please yield to the distinguished gentleman. >> thank you, leader pelosi. leader pelosi and president obama have in calling for some time now for the house of representatives to get working on legislation that will help boost growth. the economy has been improving but we know it can improve much faster if congress would do its work. two percent economic growth. because of things congress has done, like the sequester, we are slowing down economic growth in the country. the congressional budget office says economic growth this year will be one third less because of the sequester. which is why we have proposed a budget. senate democrats and the president of the united states have proposed budget that would replace the sequester wit
tag term relative because nothing really went up today. how about technology, when the economy is going south, they cut back. they don't buy, they let it lay follow. that's because they can't prove. no one can prove, listen, i get this new computer in it will make us more money. it's too ethereal. you can bring more revenue dollars down to the bottom line when you cut back on spending. you got to compete with the other guys, all of a sudden you need more hoard ware, you need more software. you got to expand t. earnings go higher. that's why so many of the other drive and semi conductors were at their 52-week highs today. it would help if business around the world would get better, too. can come in time. if you stay tuned, i will tell you which of the texts work soon. finally, there's the industrials. it is true many of these companies have done quite well. they haven't done well the way we want them to. they have cloen grown sales, they have fired, cut back, laid off to the bone. so whatever dollars have brought in flow to the bottom line, even if the dollars aren't rising very
to back off of this government program that has helped push the economy along and that has sent the markets in a tail spin. he used the word "taper", he's going to taper the program. what does that mean? well, imagine the economy to be like a kid trying to ride a bicycle after a spill, trying to get back on balance. the fed has been helping out to steady and push him along with about $85 billion a month in stimulus. ben bernanke has been looking at numbers saying housing is up almost 7% in may, unemployment 7.6%, not getting better but not getting worse, gdp, 2.6%, all of that he's saying is that all of this that is good enough that the government can start backing off and let the economy stand on its own a little more. i'll be there. if it gets in trouble, i'll step in and save it, it will be okay, there is what we should do. so why are the markets so troubled? partially because they're looking at the same numbers and they are not as confident. their sense is that if you step away from this economy right now and try to let it ride on its own, in fact you could have a lot of wob
: both sides are addressing the economy, to bring growth back. it is not easy. we are facing enormous challenges on both sides. we have different kinds of responses, different kinds of contacts in america. i think the common concern is to make sure the recovery is a sustainable one that we don't go in an up and down in terms of economic performance. i think we have established a few lines that are common. we need financial stability and we need to increase our competitiveness. we are facing enormous challenges in emerging economies. we need to adjust our economy for training and education and we need the skills in the job market. for the moment i think the g-8 has clearly identified that. we need to join efforts at the international level to create a right position. host: what needs to happen? guest: i think we need to consolidate our accounts and put our house in order in terms of the debt and deficit. that is crucial for our credibility of our efforts. at the same time, we need to invest in a new way, we need to create the sources of competitiveness for the future. so our economies
. >> and if we can be freed from some of the regulatory burdens, this economy could take off, and so will the stock market. >> thank you, sir. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good morning and welcome the "squawk on the street." i'm david faber with jim cramer and scott right here. carl quintanilla is off this morning, and afterf a 100-point rally, the fed is under the microscope as it begins, you know it, a two-day meeting. the futures are holding onto the gains and consumer prices up one point in may, and housing starts rose above street forecast, but we are looking for a higher open. >> yes. >> and a actually more defensive. looking at europe, a mixed picture, and you can see it on the continent there, but a lot of green on the map. start with our own road map starting with day one of the fed meeting as the market swings over almost any mention on the word of the word taper. president obama hints that ben bernanke could be on his way out. scott? >> and david, here is sony activist dan loeb asking for a second time to spin off the entertainment arm. th
for the stock market and the economy, they're trapped like rats. especially after today's rally. they can't afford to have this market stay higher. they're underinvested. they haven't made the money they should have! so they have to make themselves right with the napalm attack. the bears will be visible to all. their negatively will be up by the media as though it's the truth about what the fed actually said. the bears will hope that the situation will then become self-fulfilling as the tape action determines the narrative and they set the agenda. why wouldn't they? why not try to define the event? after all, who wouldn't believe the fed is causing trouble or the market is in trouble if the futures take everything down instantly. it's death defying, come in and buy. that's why at first, it will look like no stocks will have survived the onslaught tomorrow but 2:30. then a little while after, maybe by 3:15 some stocks will climb out of the b-52, but not all. some may never get out. mostly the real estate investment trust and the high yielding bond equivalents they might be buried alive. ki
to his improbable victory in a sluggish economy. and a lot of it had to do with the geek gap. and i detail that and also with obama's ability to craft a message and with romney's unbelievable level of dysfunction as a presidential candidate. >> michael: and aloofness too. you talk also about the madmen campaign of mitt romney. >> this was not my expression this was romney's chief strategist saying he was assembling a madmen team. these are ad guys from the '80s in boston, who worked on reagan's reelection campaign. so while romney was running a 20st century campaign, obama was running the first digital campaign of the 21st century, and that contrast -- everybody knows that obama did better on digital campaign i'm trying to show how. these geeks in what they called the cave in chicago, three professional poker players, child prodigy -- >> michael: wild stuff. >> to help re-engineer american politic politics. >> michael: and you had access to all of these folks? >> yeah, on both sides. midnight emails from romney's chief strategist to provide a 360 degree look
of the states like where i live in miami, don't have an economy, and basically they live off of federal money right? >> who -- >> caller: i said most southern states with these southern borders, most of these governors they don't have a real economy. there is no industry here. >> stephanie: they take more out of the federal government than they put in unlike most blue states that put in more than they take out. >> caller: exactly. my point is imagine with these border agents, that would only boost their economies, and if you think we have a problem now in trying to bring them to the table, you know, as far as negotiating with them, imagine, you know if they have a sort of fledgling economy, along with these federal dollars that are consistently going to be coming in. and if you flood the border with these agents forget about ever reducing it. because they always go back to the point where they need us. >> i think adding a few more border agents is going to not have much effect on the economy of a state. >> well, look at these states that have these prisons they are buil
at 5:00 and 6:00. >>> right now the leaders of the world's largest economies are attending dinner in ireland. president obama met with vladimir putin with syria at the top of the agenda. the issue is reminiscent of the cold war era with the u.s. and russia on different sides of the table. russia supports bashar al assad. the u.s. supports the other side. >> that summit is playing out amid allegations that the u.s. helped the united kingdom spy on diplomats during a previous summit. according to "the guardian," british hacked the phones and e-mails of britain. documents from edward snowden, the man who says he is behind the nsa leak. >>> if you live in virginia, you helped pay for vitamins for governor bob mcdonald's dog and other personal items, including his sunscreen and body wash. according to "the washington post," the mcdonald's used taxpayer money for stuff that they should have bought on their own. they billed the state for things like shoe repairs and their kids' dry cleaning. "the post" claims that someone even told them that they should be paying for the items themselves
relentlessly pumping into the economy. >> based on its review of recent economic and financial developments, we see the economy starting to go at a greater pace. >> in the world of the federal reserve thatasses for tony soprano-style drama. stewart varney, the anchor of varney and company. explain what ben bernanke said and why it got such a reaction. >> reporter: ben bernanke threatened to take away the biggest economic stimulus program we have got going for us right now. at the moment ben is printing a trillion dollars a year. he's threatening to reduce that to zero as the mid of next year. the immediate result is bad news for homeowners because interest rates are going up. home buyers. it will be tough to get a reasonably priced mortgage. and your 401k goes down. president obama is stuck. this stimulus has been taken away. he's got obama-care which has been labeled a train wreck. ben is likely to take away a very good stimulus program. martha: we will final out if this improving economy is a emperor with no clothes. what is that going to mean for everybody out there? >> you are asking the qu
weakness, and that's a weakness that will remind us that the actual economy doesn't support much higher interest rates like we had overnight, even though, ultimately, i know they will go higher. see, but this is what's been so unreal about this whole run-up in rates that's caused the stock market to get hit -- it hasn't been justified by the data. and i think monday, we will find it still isn't. thank heavens for bernanke, because if he had listened to the endless chattering hawks in the fed, i know we'd get a hideous number. all the numbers would be hideous. it's just always worth reminding, worth reminding everyone that bernanke's done amazing work, even as all i ever hear is that he's over his head or this must end badly. have you looked around at the world's other economies? we're doing better than everyone else on the globe, in part because our chief executive officers have done an excellent job in a global slowdown, but also because of exactly what bernanke's doing. this bond program has probably allowed you and other americans refi their home and companies fix their balance sheet
to show weakness, and that's a weakness that will remind us that the actual economy doesn't support much higher interest rates like we had overnight, even though, ultimately, i know they will go higher. see, but this is what's been so unreal about this whole run-up in rates that's caused the stock market to get hit -- it hasn't been justified by the data. and i think monday, we will find it still isn't. thank heavens for bernanke, because if he had listened to the endless chattering hawks in the fed, i know we'd get a hideous number. all the numbers would be hideous. it's just always worth reminding, worth reminding everyone that bernanke's done amazing work, even as all i ever hear is that he's over his head or this must end badly. have you looked around at the world's other economies? we're doing better than everyone else on the globe, in part because our chief executive officers have done an excellent job in a global slowdown, but also because of exactly what bernanke's doing. this bond program has probably allowed you and other americans refi their home and companies fix their balanc
bunker, and also coming in, michael jackson. and as the century moved to its conclusion with the economy booming, it was madonna, the material girl, and then bruce springsteen, and in the early 21st century, this century of ours in the aftermath of 9/11, it was all about trying to hold things together, especially our families, and our american icon became a husband, a father, a guy from jersey, a crime boss. his name, tony soprano. james lipton is the host of bravo's "inside the actors studio," and paul farhi is with "the washington post." james gandolfini's portrayal of tony soprano, there was one bedrock of truth of everything he did. he was just a family guy trying to hold everything together. in an early first season episode, he was on a car trip to visit prospective colleges with his daughter, who confronts him about his line of work. let's listen. >> are you in the mafia? >> am i in the what? >> whatever you want to call it. organized crime. >> that's total crap. who told you that? >> dad, i have lived in the house all my life. i have seen police come with warrants. i have seen you
about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] if you can't stand the heat, get off the test track. get the mercedes-benz you've been burning for at the summer event, going on now at your authorized mercedes-benz dealer. hurry, before this opportunity cools off. favorite no commentññññññ administration not so flattering and so he's just decided that he will stop talking to them. >> it is a policy he will come to reconsider and i would suspect withdraw what he thinks about it because -- the papers come out every day. >> yeah. i mean, it is incredible. very, very bad judgment. because it is one of those things first of all, it -- looks bad. i think if you are the average voter you think that you can't punish up ins for -- you know, running things you don't like then will have to waive on it. >> more bad news for the
. they might give you a sense of how much people are spend on the homes. another driver of the economy has slowed down of late. slowed down for all but the galleries of restoration hardware. there's been a rough couple of weeks for the consumer package good names. they had been viewed as bond market equivalents. was that proctor up for real, was that j&j rally for real? we have to know. when they report on wednesday, big g. and mccormick and conagra report on thursday, we'll find out if they can actually have more than just a dead cat bounce. if the numbers are good and the stocks go up maybe they're no longer hostage to the tnx i told you to follow. but you know, if the tnx goes higher and the stocks go down, we're in the same world of hurt. why am i showing this? this is from mccormick spice, old bay spice the special ravens model. i think it's cool. it might not matter if the interest rates keep going higher though, so remember it's the bond market stupid. two companies -- two companies that delivered terrific quarters last time around, nike and accenture give us the report cards on thu
the economy, we can talk. but the unconstitutionallizing of -- institutionalizing is part of the obama legacy. go ahead. >> this is not film to say that he is as bad as bush to say there's one area that he is following in bush's footsteps and in some ways, has our ability to do surveillance on a massive scale has increased so has that surveillance. >> stephanie: well, you know you probably saw michael hayden on the sunday shows who is the head of this under bush. he said look, obama is doing this with much more transparency than we did. he's doing it -- everything obama has said with more oversight and more checks and balances. you can have the whole discussion. should we be doing any of it in the first place. i had alan grayson on last week who i love. we have to have agitators and great liberals but his bill, when the president said you didn't have 100% security and 100% privacy his bill would give us 100% privacy but i don't think it's workable. >> i think i said last week, my take is this is happening. we now know it is happening. that it's not not going to happen. and even if they craft
currently as projects focused on the economy, energy, health care, regulatory reform, homeland security, foreign policy, democracy, and no immigration. each of these initiatives is headed by a diverse team of political and business leaders. subject matter experts, stakeholders, and academics who work closely with a policy team to develop consensus based solutions. the bipartisan policy advocacy network separately funded and provided strategic advice and aggressive political advocacy to ensure that the bbc policy recommendations gain traction with congress and the executive branch. the housing commission was established by the bbc in the fall of 2011 with the generous financial support of the macarthur foundation and under the leader and guidance of our for co-chairs, former u.s. senators. and former hud secretary henry cisneros. charged with examining the effectiveness of our nation's full range of federal support to housing to help chart a new course for federal housing policy. our report have been america's future, new directions for national policy which released in february with rec
the economy looks like it's on the mend. so, take a look at these numbers. the economy is expected to grow by at least 3% next year. unemployment could drop as low as 6.5% by next year. it's all looking like better news. but on the flipside, interest rates are moving higher, which means that the cost of buying a home or buying even a car could go up. so, take a look at this. every time that mortgage rates go up just 1%, the cost of buying a home gets 10% more expensive. that could deter a lot of buyers. and of course, higher interest rates, they do benefit some people like savers and retirees living off bank accounts and cds. so, it's some good news for those living on a fixed income, josh. >> indeed it is. rebecca jarvis, thank you for that. >>> we're going to turn to the firefight in the west. at last check, that fast-moving wildfire north of phoenix is 0% contained. you see pictures of it there. nearly 500 homes are threatened. and another wildfire has erupted in colorado. this one southwest of denver. those hot and windy conditions are fueling the flames. sam's forecast coming up in a
parkts do markets down 1 to 3%. this is the world reacting to the economy being well enough so they can pull back sometime next year. >> can i ask a stupid question? >> what's your stupid question. >> first of all, if the economy is doing better, and we all knew the stimulus is temporary, why is this such a surprise? >> that is a great question, because this is exactly what everyone said they thought would happen, that the fed would say stimulus is going to continue, but they would give a road map for how it would be tamped down. that's exactly what happened. the nagging worries you still see in global markets. record unemployment in europe. china's factory output is the slowest in nine months. last year china's growth was the slowest in 13 years, and there's this worry that if you have no fed in the u.s., you have no growth. look how much money the fed has been pumping into the system. you have the fed's balance sheet that has exploded and you still only have 2% growth in the u.s. if you've got china slowing and the fed pulling back at the same time, what is that going to mean for mark
falls below 6.5%. he has no fixed plan to stop purchasing the securities helping to lift the economy. even when they stop, they won't turn around and sell them, which would be bad for investors. we've had several billionaire money managers writing in to voice their continued confidence in the stock market saying this will all pass too. afterall, the economy is heading in the right direction. tr tamron, if you want to invest in the stock market right now, you're going to have to have a steel stomach. >> thank you, kayla. the news nation is also following breaking news out of the white house where president obama is about to nominate james comey to be the next head of the fbi. he's a former justice department official who helped oversee the legality of the national surveillance program under president george w. bush. if confirmed by the senate, he would replace robert mueller, who's head of the agency since september 2001. although fbi directors are limited to a single ten-year term, mueller's term was extended by the senate at the president's request. comey's nomination comes as the f
. >> and, by the way, economy, an economy that's -- >> and the economy. >> all right, we'll wait and see on that one. it's not quite back yet. >> just ahead, was celebrity tv chef nigella lawson publicly choked by her husband? and why some families worry about the bread their eating and why wheat farmers are worried about losing money. it's monday, a brand new start. with centurylink visionary cloud infrastructure, and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable, secure, and agile. we know it's your videoconference of the day. hi! hi, buddy! that's why the free wifi and hot breakfast are something to smile about. book a great getaway now and feel the hamptonality >>> questions are swirling about the marriage of celebrity chef nigella lawson after pictures surfaced of her husband with his hand around her neck at a restaurant. her husband is denying any claims he attacked her. cnn's international correspondent matthew chance is in london with the latest. matthew, these pictures just look awful. >> they do. they really illustrate as well, jim, the idea that if you're a c
action to slow climate change and putting people back to work as our economies recover. >> obama: every person can enjoy the dignity that comes from work whether they live in chicago or cleveland or belfast or berlin, in athens or madrid, everybody deserves opportunity. we have to have economies that are working for all people, not just those at the very top. >> speaking of the economy a new cnn rsp poll asks if you're better economically now? >> conditions are somewhat good, 44% of americans say their personal financial situation worse off than a year ago. kind of a mixed bag. we're back after the break. party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know i'm going to be the first one to call them out. cenk on air>> what's unacceptable is how washington continues to screw the middle class over. cenk off air>>> i don't want the middle class taking the brunt of the spending cuts and all the different programs that wind up hurting the middle class. cenk on air>>> you got to go to the local level, the state level and we have to fight hard to make sure they can't buy our poli
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